Observe your feelings

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If something scares you, chances are, you’re not the only one who will find it scary.           © sxc

A couple of days ago I wrote a post about the perils of “writing what you know”. Today I will explain why I think writing about what you know, is a good idea. (Aaaah, the fickleness of the female heart!) At least, when it comes to feelings. Observing them well, is like digging up gold for a writer. Continue reading

Beware of your passion

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Maybe you feel passionate about dancing. Good for you! Don’t forget your reader may not. A writer’s job is to evoke that passion in his reader, starting from scratch. It’s harder than you might think. © sxc

“Write about what you know”, well-meaning gurus and writing manuals tell you. Or “follow your passion”. I’m not so sure about that.

When “write what you know” means something like “if you really, really dig thrillers and thrillers are all you ever read, then please don’t try to write a chicklit novel”, then fine. I agree. But writing about what you know, also includes some nasty traps. Continue reading

Write scenes, not books

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A writer ‘s gotta do what a writer ‘s gotta do. © sxc

Write a scene, not a book. Although I am definitely trying to write a novel, this is the most important principle for me to keep in mind if I want to get any writing done.

If I sit down behind my computer, thinking about my book, or worse, my “oeuvre”, then all I can see is the giant amount of work that’s still in front of me. Of course every writer, aspiring or established, fantasizes about holding those two crispy covers, with 360 pages of indisputable genius in between. But for me, personally, that thought mostly cramps my style. As a result, I will find myself dawdling on Facebook or Twitter, streaming some television series, making yet another cup of coffee, or – well yes – blogging.

While if I manage to keep my mind focused on one thing, writing one good scene, just one, then that seems feasible. The “good” might be still up for discussion, but at least I’ll have a scene. And then another one. And…

And what’s most important, focusing on the scene at hand helps me to genuinely enjoy my writing. Firstly because the stakes don’t feel so (friggin’) high, but also because I can feel that fun little jolt of achievement after every scene, instead of once every two years or so.

And if you’ll excuse me now, I’ve got another scene in mind. But first, I think I’ll make myself a cup of tea…

Fast or slow?

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Fast is for action…

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… nice and slow is for other scenes. © sxc

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As he hears the soft but unmistakeable clutter of metal behind him, he spins around on his heels with the speed of a leopard in full attack. What he sees, takes his breath away and makes him fear his days are numbered. It is Xena, the mythical warrior princess, coming at him with eyes ablazing and swaying some sort of circular weapon he has never seen before, leaving him in the dark on how he is to defend himself against it.

There are quite a few reasons why this piece of text stinks. But one of them is the huge clash between the pace of the text and the supposed speed of the action described. Continue reading